How Did the World React To Japan’s New Security Bill?

When this news reached Hong Lei, spokesperson for the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs, he criticized Japan and requested the preservation of ‘peace’ through learning from the past and listening to the voice of ‘justice’ from in and around Japan, thus drawing upon historical issues to support his argument.

That China, who is in conflict with Japan, should criticize Japan is not surprising. Yet, how have other nations seen it?

 

Neighboring Countries and Their Reactions To the Security Bill

Media from overseas have published reports that have drawn on both arguments for and against the security bill. Within these reports, however, there is evidence of each county’s national interests at play.

The American Reuters touched on the fact that the bill was passed amidst demonstrations against it, and reported that those who were against the bill were claiming that, “Japan will become involved in America’s war”. At the same time, they explained that the reason behind Japan’s passing of this bill was due to the increasingly deteriorating state of national security, especially in issues surrounding China and North Korea.

They also said that the American government with its continued opposition to China was supportive of Japan’s new security bill because there is a need for Japan to contribute to the safety of the Asia Pacific.

The Gulf News of the United Arab Emirates published that since terrorism is threatening the world, Japan has a duty as a powerful nation to fight against terrorist organizations such as the Islamic State. It argued that Japan ought to push forward with the security bill. Looking back over the current chaos in the Middle East, this opinion appears to reflect the particular circumstances.

Generally, many overseas media have had high expectations for the effectiveness of Japan’s new security bill.

 

The “I Hate War” Attitude Won’t Protect Your Peace

No one wants to fight a war. Considering Japan’s national interests, however, strengthening national security is an urgent want. Around Japan are countries with clear intentions to invade, and whether or not they do so, there is enough possibility for the effects of war to reach our shores.

Stopping conflicts and warfare in the world coincide with ‘world justice’ and also Japan’s national interests. To prepare for the worst-case scenario, Japan must not only further strengthen its power as a nation, but also have a unique political and foreign affairs power that is on par with its national defense.

http://eng.the-liberty.com/2015/5971/